Shine on #latergram (at Pulaski Bridge)

gracebello:

Currently reading

One of my favorite books of all time!!!!!!!!

I’m a big, big girl in a big, big world

theparisreview:

“It’s easier to understand the idea of death than the reality of life, and so we make an industry of waiting, imagining our end lumbering toward our vain and cubicled selves, inventing the selfish moral blank spots we suspect ourselves of being.”

Michael Thomsen on the vanity of the zombie apocalypse.

Don’t get me wrong, I love post-apocalyptic stories, but something about the zombie conceit always rubbed me the wrong, as perfectly articulated here:
The underlying expectation here—that without Western civilization humans would become monsters—is a psychic tic of game designers, who tend to be overeducated upper-middle-class men whose primary lens for understanding the world comes from commercial entertainment
vintageanchorbooks:

"Percentile is destiny in America."
Walter Kirn, Lost in the Meritocracy 
From elementary school on, Walter Kirn knew how to stay at the top of his class: He clapped erasers, memorized answer keys, and parroted his teachers’ pet theories. But when he launched himself eastward to an Ivy League university, Kirn discovered that the temple of higher learning he had expected was instead just another arena for more gamesmanship, snobbery, and social climbing. In this whip-smart memoir of kissing-up, cramming, and competition, Lost in the Meritocracy reckons the costs of an educational system where the point is simply to keep accumulating points and never to look back—or within. 

vintageanchorbooks:

"Percentile is destiny in America."

Walter Kirn, Lost in the Meritocracy 

From elementary school on, Walter Kirn knew how to stay at the top of his class: He clapped erasers, memorized answer keys, and parroted his teachers’ pet theories. But when he launched himself eastward to an Ivy League university, Kirn discovered that the temple of higher learning he had expected was instead just another arena for more gamesmanship, snobbery, and social climbing. In this whip-smart memoir of kissing-up, cramming, and competition, Lost in the Meritocracy reckons the costs of an educational system where the point is simply to keep accumulating points and never to look back—or within. 

The truth is, no one really knows what a society that does not privilege whiteness would look like in the U.S.; we haven’t seen it yet. How might we build such an alternative structure?
nokkasili:

146.2
“Too often, [Ken] Chen says, publishing companies say they would publish more diverse books, but the market just isn’t there for them. Chen doesn’t buy that.

“Your ability to imagine that there is a market has to do with your ability to imagine that those people exist,” he says. “And if [you] can’t imagine that people of color actually exist and can buy books, then you can’t imagine selling books to them. That’s not just about a company corporate diversity policy; it’s about actually knowing what’s going on in communities of color.””
— Ken Chen, poet and director of the Asian American Writers Workshop, to NPR (“To Achieve Diversity In Publishing, A Difficult Dialogue Beats Silence” by Lynn Neary)

(via bycheng)

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

MORE LADIES ARE ALWAYS REQUIRED <3

I think this applies to the troll (aka #Fungary appreciation)—would you agree, athena & slim? #withmygreek

(via lauriehalseanderson)